House & Garden (British)

The February 2011 issue of House & Garden almost got it right.  I’m talking about the mix of articles–not the gardens they chose to profile.  There are three features on gardens…two about designers and an additional monthly feature on products. Yea!  Not many shelter publications that center around residential design have even one feature on designed outdoor spaces–let alone three–especially in the winter.  For that alone it’s is a win.

Nothing is mentioned of any of these articles on the cover however…and there is the lose part.

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Where's the mention?

Touting Choosing the Best, inside the magazine is an article titled The House and Garden guide to the Leading Garden Designers of Today–yet no mention on the cover?  What happened to the ‘garden’ in House and?

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Feature on Best British Garden Designers--hooray!

There’s a wonderful feature on Dar el Hossoun, the gardens of a lodge and spa in southern Morocco designed by French garden designers Arnaud Maurieres and Eric Ossart.  The gardens manage to respect traditional Moroccan motifs using contemporary ideas about planting.

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Editorial spread w/beauty shots and great content

The third feature is  a pictorial of Colonsay House in Scotland–a wild garden with a world class collection of rhododendrons.

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Rhododendrons and more in the wilds of Scotland

Now why don’t more shelter/design magazines consider the designed outdoor environment?

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About Susan aka Miss. R

Professional landscape designer, lover of the land and all things design.
LABELS: Design, Garden Design, Garden Styles, Gardens, magazines

5 Responses to House & Garden (British)

  1. David C. says:

    Yes, what a missed opportunity to not flash THOSE great garden pieces on the cover.

    But it is a greater travesty to see outdoor living as an afterthought in magazines or in people who own homes or any properties. Until it becomes pop-culture, it may remain this way. Maybe someone can promote horticulture showing celebrities in their outdoor spaces – just not Lady Gaga, please!

    Connecting the dots David (aka Quercus). We have to demand respect as a design discipline rather than an offshoot of gardening.–s

  2. Glad I’m not the only grumbler. I was a little surprised by the most recent issue of Garden Design magazine. With the lack of “gardens” featured, it felt more like a Pottery Barn catalog. Def disappointing.

    Was that The New Victorians issue? I thought that was good. Have to see the ‘new’ one…don’t have it yet! Will let you know.–s

  3. Michelle D. says:

    Will have to seek out this issue next time I am at Borders.
    Thanks for the tip.
    In regards to the newly minted Garden Design magazine, I don’t care for the new graphics, font or layout. It looks dated circa 1970’s. Also don’t care for the way they put the advertisements with the articles – too close- when they put the ad down the side of the column next to an article. ick.
    The content is still the best that there is for a garden design based magazine.
    Just don’t care for the dated layout and fonts.

    Perhaps GD just reflects the current interest in all things 70s….–s

  4. James Golden says:

    I’m in complete agreement. Always much more house than garden, and the garden usually only plays a supporting role. It’s our cultural ignorance or limitation in the US.

    Gardens in this country are published in a flurry of secondary and specialty publications. Designed environments deserve better.–s

  5. The balance is ridiculous. The strange thing is we walk through the garden to the house and we look out on it from the house. How important is that to the feel of the rooms?
    Fortunately there are plenty of other design influences to be gained from such a mag to justify buying it.
    It is also the mag that our customers have on their coffee table so we had better know what was in it!
    Best
    R

    I think you’ve made a very important side point…do we as designers know what magazines our clients read? Aren’t those the magazines we should aim to be in?–s

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