Tender Ballerinas

A slightly damaged Styrax japonica ‘Emerald Pagoda’ has become mine.  I have always wanted one. The blooms remind me of the chorus in Swan Lake.  It’s supposedly only hardy to Z7 and I’m in Z6. If I plant it in a slightly sheltered position next to the house in my sunny side yard it might be just fine.

Styrax Emerald Pagoda 300x239 Tender Ballerinas

Ballerinas

I won’t plant it for clients until I’m sure it will make it through the winter. That’s the main reason my garden is such a hodge podge…I have to see a plant growing before I’ll spec it for someone else–it’s part of the trust factor between designer and client.

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About Susan aka Miss. R

Professional landscape designer, lover of the land and all things design.
LABELS: Garden Styles, plants

2 Responses to Tender Ballerinas

  1. Beautiful indeed. I thought you didn’t buy plants for yourself! Who was that salmony-pink peony for … ? LOL

    Buying plants for myself is such a rare occurence that I forget that every now and then I buy 1. The tree was an adopted reject–no money involved.

  2. Susan,

    I do the same thing, test out plants in my own garden before spec’ing them in a client’s garden. So far, I’ve discovered I should no longer use abelia or erica. They don’t seem to perfom for me as I had hoped they would. This spring I got such pleasure from a mixed box of daffs I planted last fall and will be recommending them without any hesitation.

    It takes longer to use a ‘hot’ plant, but the result is worth it for clients–better plants=better long term gardens=happy

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